About Us

IAEJ Mandate

The International Alliance of Equestrian Journalists (IAEJ) was created over 50 years ago to promote and maintain contacts among equestrian journalists of all nations and act as a conduit to the International Equestrian Federation (FEI). The relationship of cooperation that the IAEJ now enjoys with the FEI and Organizing Committees the world over is the result of decades of interaction.

Aims

Practically speaking, our aim has always been to ensure that working conditions are optimal for our members at all international equestrian events. To that aim, the IAEJ participated in the development and implementation of the Olympic Results and Information Service (ORIS) for Equestrian and was instrumental in the creation of the Guidelines for Media Operations at FEI events. This document was designed specifically to help show organisers of all different levels and sizes to provide appropriate working conditions for their events. The IAEJ has been and will continue to be proactive in this regard.

We have worked in tandem with the FEI, before, during and after Olympic Games, World Championships, European Championships and Pan Am Games, to ensure the goal of good service is met and the bar is raised recurrently. We aim to be actively engaged with every Organising Committee on practically every facet of their media operations from visas to locker sizes.

In 2018 the IAEJ sent a representative to the 2020 World Press Briefing in Tokyo to review logistics and facilities. The IAEJ was successful in bringing forward recommendations from London 2012 which were implemented at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games. Likewise, we are hopeful that the shortfalls the IAEJ identified in Rio, will be rectified in Tokyo.

Our objectives in 2019 include ensuring compliance with the reforms of the 2018 General Data Protection Regulations and the creation of a standardized Accreditation form with universally acceptable terms and conditions.

The IAEJ is working daily for its members. Please join us to benefit from our endeavors.

Organization

The IAEJ consists of The General Assembly and The Bureau

The General Assembly

The General Assembly meets at least once a year. In principle, this meeting will take place at an event where a reasonable proportion of the IAEJ membership will be present such as, Olympic Games, World or European Championships or World Cup Finals. Every four years, there will be an election on the composition of the Bureau. The General Assembly agrees to possible alterations of the statutes which may be presented. All decisions are made by a simple majority of present members. A majority of two-thirds of present members is required for statute alterations.

The Bureau

The Bureau consists of seven members, a President, a Vice-President, a Treasurer/Secretary and four members. One member must be from North America, one from Europe, and one has to be a photographer. The members of the Bureau are elected for a four-year term. A Bureau member can succeed himself in office for two terms only. The Bureau is in charge of all current matters. It designates IAEJ delegates to international competitions and decides on the acceptance of new members. To view the composition of the Current Bureau please see the Members Directory.

Statement of Purpose

The IAEJ was formed to improve working conditions for the media at equestrian events, further the communication between the FEI and the media, and provide a forum through which show organizers, sponsors, competitors and the media can communicate with each other. It does not act as a job bank that provides work for members; nor does it provide accreditation. While the IAEJ disseminates information on Olympic Games accreditation and works with National Olympic Committees, the International Olympic Committee and the FEI to ensure that credentials are available for equestrian specialists, it is each member’s responsibility to apply for accreditation. IAEJ candidates must be involved with international, not strictly national events within the FEI family of disciplines and work at a high standard in order to be accepted into the organization, a process that requires the approval of their peers.